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20130121
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 200 (some duplicates have been removed)
against the prime minister's government. they say the government promotes sectarian policies that discriminate against them. the latest violence began after the police. -- block protesters from entering the city. >> which call upon the army -- we call upon the army affiliated with iraq. if it is only loyal to the muslim nation and only belongs to the good land of iraq, to open the way for the scholars and people to give in to the city. they are not allowed to get in right now. the army has to be loyal to iraq. >> let's take some live pictures coming in from fallujah. the crowds are still swelling. a lot of sunnis and happy and calling for the government to be dissolved and one more representative of the people to be formed. we will bring you the story as we get the details. let's continue with live pictures. this is coming from egypt. people are beginning to gather in tahrir square. a large turnout is expected in the next few hours. opposition groups are marking the second anniversary of the revolution. overnight, protesters fought with police in and around tahrir square. doz
. the government's promise of a cease-fire. >> i do solemnly swear. >> barack obama is sworn in to the second term. and a brush with fame. troops are working to secure an clear gas pumps. the attackers kidnapped and killed dozens of farm workers. soldiers found another 25 dead hostages on sunday. one security official has at least 81, including captives and attackers. five of the hostage-takers were captured and found alive. they had all been killed in the final assault 20 years of experience in afghanistan, he is claiming his group is behind the attack. >> he is of the brigade. he claims his men launched an attack in eastern algeria, offering to stop if the u.s. releases from prison the man known from the blind shake -- as the blind shake. it is not clear if he took part of the assault or if he survived. he is believed to have been shot on thursday and sent to a news website. algerian bomb disposal teams are searching the plant for explosives and the remains of those killed during saturday's's final assault to freedom. they did recover more bodies on saturday. as many as 25. authorities released
election area -- post-coup government. we have got a short-term challenge in restoring their security. the french, i think, in partnership with the military, are doing a great job. there are longer-term challenges, restoring things. this is what led to the rebellion and the coup in the first place. >> do you think they should be deploying drones? >> we have used drones against al qaeda in pakistan, afghanistan, and other places in the world. i think it is incumbent on us in the senate to make sure we have a framework for when and how we're going to approve the use of drones. i do think they are an important tool in our toolkit to fight back against islamic extremists and to take action against folks who have demonstrated to be a real threat to the united states and our regional allies. >> thank you very much for joining us from capitol hill tonight. >> thank you. >> in other news now, senior officials say that leon panetta, the defense secretary, decided to lift a ban about women in combat. it will make available hundreds of thousands of jobs. women are part of the active military per
of these islamist authoritarian governments. what are the consequences of that? in syria you talk about al qaeda presence. it's unlikely an al qaeda affiliated group will take over syria or egypt. greater likelihood perhaps in egypt and not even there. what is american influence look like -- what should it look like in this post revolutionary period when there was so much excitement about the prospect of egyptian democracy taking root in way that would be in concert with the u.s. at a time when there are people very critical of the o bama administration for essentially getting out of the way, letting the revolution happen and then turning their backs on the likes of mubarak who could have at least guaranteed some level of stability? >> i think it was an illusion to imagine that we could somehow have shut the flood gates and prevented the revolution in egypt. backing mubarak wasn't an option. and i think the president did the right thing by trying to get on the right side of history there. but now the challenge of the post revolutionary phase in egypt is to try to work with a government there tha
stronghold. british children learn about forced marriage as the british government or as to ban the practice. barack obama has officially begun his second term. they're putting the issue touches to a more elaborate inauguration on monday. he's the 17th u.s. president to serve a second term in office. he took the oath of office a small ceremony earlier. >> i greater thanbarack hussein obama do solemnly swear that i will faithfully execute the office of the united states and will to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states. >> our white house correspondent takes a look ahead at what lies in store for the president the next four years. >> the first time president barack obama took the oath of office -- he did it in front of the biggest crowd washington d.c. has seen it all of its history. almost 2 billion people here to hear him make the promises. >> on this day, we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recriminations and worn out dog was that for far too long have struggled our politics. >> things did not help
in the interests of britain and not europe, and that they will no longer be blackmailed by the british government. >> we will have a look at what britt's think about this referendum later in the show. now to israeli politics, which are famous for being bolick tile. yesterday's elections certainly underlined that. p>> they were expected to triggr a lurch to the right, but the biggest gains went to a new centrist party, led by a former tv presenter. his party came second. >> the prime minister suffered the biggest losses. his right wing alliance lost almost a quarter of its seats, although it still the biggest grouping. >> netanyahu looks likely to remain prime minister, but he may have to tone down his hard- line position to build a coalition. >> the day after the election, israelis were trying to make sense of the new political landscape. many wonder if israel faces a deadlock after benjamin netanyahu lost so much ground to the left wing. while the israeli leader remains the country's political strongman, he knows he will have to engage. on wednesday, he gave his interpretation of the results. >>
. demonstrators attacked police trying to protect government buildings. inevitable retaliation by security forces reminiscent of the protests of the past caused new anchor. -- new anger. this evening, there is news of more clashes in cairo and elsewhere. more injuries and no deaths as well. a historic day, but this is no celebration. a lot of parallels have been drawn between what happened today and two years ago. a lot of the slogans in tahrir square were remarkably similar. in the city of suez, there were five us today. two years ago, there were three deaths that ultimately toppled the ministry. >> two years ago, the protests in egypt led to the overthrow of hosni mubarak. what impact do you think these protests might have that we're seeing now? >> president morsi and the muslim brotherhood will be nervous about what they have seen today. it is important to say while there is disillusionment, things have not gone as people fought -- thought he debuts ago. the pace of change has not been great. we're talking about a split between the liberals and those in the support the brotherhood on the other
that the u.s. needs to change its policy towards the government of iran which they say is a rational actor and will play a leading role in the middle east for years to come. this is about an hour. >> it is an honor this morning to introduce flynt leverett who served at the state department and cia, but he's currently a professor at penn state out of carlyle. also with him is hillary mann leverett, and she served at the national security council and the state department. she negotiated the u.s. government, with the u.s. government with the iranian officials. she's now a senior professor, lecturer at american university in washington. their writing has appeared in "the new york times," politico, foreign policy and washington monthly, among others. they came to us last night from virginia. they took the late night train and stayed here. and what i'd like to do is just turn it over to you for your thoughts and comments to start off. >> well, thank you very much. i'm going to start off for us today. let me start by thanking you for hosting us. it's a real honor and pleasure, and we look forward
labour government. >> will be prime minister join me in paying tribute to all the athletes who took part in the british -- held in my constituency? will be prime minister encourage people to register which will help us save lives of? >> i certainly could be to all those who took part in the british transplant games into the many volunteers who made these games such a success. i think gillian did a fantastic job in hosting the games. is quite right to raise this issue. they are a testament to the benefit of transplantation and i would encourage people to do as he says. >> seventy-seven of our young people with the most complex special needs face being without places next year because of government cuts. why should the most vulnerable young people in my constituency pay the price for his economic failures? >> first of all let me make the point to the honorable lady that the recent were having to make cuts is because of the mess left by her government. no one wants have to make the difficult decisions we've had to make in government, but i would argue when it comes to helping the disabled,
on rebels from the north. the government extended the state of emergency for three months as it waits for support from african troops in what could be a long conflict. there is a warning that the situation is likely to get much worse. more on that in a moment. jackie reports from monaco. >> the town -- from mali. >> after a week of heavy fighting, the rebels cleared on sunday, leaving the way for troops to take the town. >> i look all around us. we must search and search some more. there may be still a few pockets of indian resistance. >> theophylline fell into it -- theopoli fell into rebel hands. french troops were fulfilling the goals set by their president. >> our objective was to stop the terrorist offensive. malianto allow bucknthye army to win back, and they would allow it to get back territorial integrity. we know that will take more time. >> those african troops have been arriving slowly over the past few days. at the moment they can be counted in the hundreds, but they aim is to have several thousand to take over ground operations from the french. >> everyone is in agreement
it poses to the world. from the standpoint of stability. and peaceful transition of governments. we're reminded of that almost every day. and -- sweeps across the middle of the world starting in indonesia and coming across northern africa and moving down to the sub sahara part of africa. this is a threat that has enormous implications. we have seen that ignoring the threat as we did in afghanistan pre 9/11. t true that the american public is more wary but never the less, we're reminding every day on cnn n and other networks and journalists from "the washington post . >> talk more i want to get that mentioned in there. we're living in different kind of world. it's hard to define where the threat is because it popping up everywhere. it's like wack a mole. you wack one iraq and you think it get it settles and you're back in afghanistan. and we are in the arab spring and libya and algeria and things are happening that pose real threats particularly at the time when the possibility of the combination of weapons of mass destruction and terrorists can result in attack on american presence
shan't for more see to step down. -- chant for morsi to step down. our guest says the government should have been prepared. >> we should not have been at this stage. the needless deaths were unnecessary, and the government was largely responsible for that. everyone knows tensions were incredibly high a in anticipation of the verdict for the 2012 february rampage that left 70 people dead, and there were major protests in cairo on thursday by the supporters of the opposition team, so clearly the government should have been prepared for what occurred on saturday, and they were not, and that is criminally negligent, so we should not have high and deaths occur the day, and we should not have been the state we are in now, which is a state of emergency. i am skeptical there is going to be meaningful dialogue taking place. what many people have come to the conclusion that the calls for dialogue have been less than fully is sincere. it is not clear what kind of inclusion would take place as a measure of the -- as a result of sie dialogue, so mr. mor has lost credibility. it is worth when separat
spending cut is coming in nine days. don't listen to the big government spenders. we need budget cuts to grow the economy, shrink government and create confidence that we are not greece. and, oh, heck, my friend steve kroft lobbed a bunch of softballs at president obama and hillary clinton in his "60 minutes" interview last night. and you know what, folks, we still do not know what happened on that tragic, awful night in benghazi when four people were killed. the administration spun two separate stories, we still don't know the narrative. all that, the "kudlow report" starts right now. >>> first up tonight, it could prove to be the most significant immigration reform in years. bipartisan group of four democratic and four republican senators unveiling their blueprint this afternoon for border security, guest worker cards, more foreign brainiacs and employer verification, maybe even a path to citizenship. cnbc's own eamon javers joins us now with the details. good evening, eamon. >> well, we've almost gotten out of practice at watching bipartisan groups of senators hold press conference
took to the streets in other cities. demonstrators attacked police trying to protect government buildings. inevitable retaliation by security forces reminiscent of the protests of the past caused new anchor. -- new anger. this evening, there is news of more clashes in cairo and elsewhere. more injuries and no deaths as well. a historic day, but this is no celebration. a lot of parallels have been drawn between what happened today and two years ago. a lot of the slogans in tahrir square were remarkably similar. in the city of suez, there were five us today. two years ago, there were three deaths that ultimately toppled the ministry. >> two years ago, the protests in egypt led to the overthrow of hosni mubarak. what impact do you think these protests might have that we're seeing now? >> president morsi and the muslim brotherhood will be nervous about what they have seen today. it is important to say while there is disillusionment, things have not gone as people fought -- thought he debuts ago. the pace of change has not been great. we're talking about a split between the liberals
government actually reacted quite favorably and also responded to our demand with a change, a certain change in their policies. i must admit that i looked with a certain degree of concern at japan right now. for europe, too, it's going to be important, um, that the big injection of liquidity that was given into the markets for the sake of the banks is siphoned off again. but i think the ecb is, actually, here a very positive force. they're playing a very positive role, and they will see to it that one refrains from the policy of manipulation and that, um, one pursues a policy that actually reflects the situation as it is that everyone is doing it as is the ecb. i think we would have less problems all over the world, but that's about the extent of my comment. [speaking german] >> translator: since you've touched upon central banks, what exactly are the objectives of central banks? we have the federal reserve that has set itself an additional objective, we've seen the more recent developments in japan. what did you think about the independence? you touched upon it, alluded to it. maybe you cou
sequesters with cuts in other areas of government. we have shown how to protect defense spending by cutting spending in other areas. in our budget last year, we did take money out of defense. just not nearly as much as the president seems to want to. but we think the sequesters will happen because the democrats have opposed our efforts to replace those cuts with others and offered no alternatives. >> is this worth shutting the government down over? >> no one is talking about shutting the government down. >> well, it's a piece of the leverage that conservatives have. you didn't want to fight over the debt ceiling because you thought you can't do that, you have to pay the government's bills. do you think this fight over priority is worth shutting the government down? >> we're not interested in shutting the government down. what happens on march 1 is spending goes down automatically. march 27 is when the moment you're talking about, the continuing resolution expires. we are more than happy to keep spending at those levels going on into the future while we debate how to balance the budget, grow
politics. many are still traumatized. al jazeera, malian border. >> in syria, activists say government forces are shelling more on the capital damascus. activists also posted this video online of rebels of having regime troops in a prison. rebels have read more than 80 inmates. an iranian official said an attack on syria is considered an attack on iran. patriot missile battles could spark a broader conflict. turkey and nato stressed the system is particularly defensive. >> these batteries are designed to intercept missiles and the threats comes from syria. this is one of three areas. turkey and nato officials have repeatedly said the missiles will in no way be used for an offensive operation or to support a no-fly zone. >> it is pretty obvious that the defensive systems are only for defensive purposes want you look -- want to look at their location. >> and it just as the deployment will contribute to the deal escalation of the prices along the border. russia and iran have said the deployment could spark a broader conflict. >> turkey requested the misfiles after several incidences. thos
meeting had ministers from both governments working on, proposals to deepen the economic and military union. >> she says the proposals are about a deeper cooperation in economic policy with the goal a social security, employment, nd financials. >> the spirit of cooperation was exactly what the treaty of friendship was all about. >> here is a look back. >> the idyllic village near the border region has a special place in european history. and is the birthplace of the franco-german friendship. after two world wars, if you believe such a thing was possible. the unthinkable did happen. they did not have much in common. both catholic and a conservative. >> what was surprising is that the first contact in 1958 did not take place in the palace but at his private the state in a comfortable family surroundings. they spent the whole weekend of their. he treated him like a guest of the family. he did not stay in a hotel. >> he was the only politician to have been given that privilege. any mistrust between the two men evaporated. >> their relationship led to the declaration of a musical about. th
cards to work with to form a government here. one of his deputies, the deputy prime minister, frankly admitted that, in fact, they could have lost the young voters in this election and that is the main reason why they are now down a quarter from the total of the seats that they had in the outgoing. >> north korea is promising to strengthen its nuclear program after a new round of u.n. sanctions. this victory council unanimously passed a resolution in response to rocket launch -- the security council unanimously passed a resolution in response to the rocket launch in december. >> the draft resolution has been adopted unanimously. as resolution 27, 2013. >> as resolution 2087, 2013. >> the security council condemned what it described as a missilemelissposted technology and warned that for the consequences. >> today's resolution makes clear that, if north korea chooses again to defy the international community, such as by conducting of the and -- conducting another launch for a nuclear test, then the council will take significant action. >> the difference was the near- minute response fr
of the house of january 3, 2013, of the following individuals to serve as the governing board of the office of congressional ethics. the clerk: nominated by the speaker with the concurrence of the minority leader -- mr. porter j. goss, mr. egan, ms. hayward, mr. friendswood. nominated by the minority leader with the concurrence of the speaker -- mr. david scaggs of colorado, co-chairman. mrs. yvonne burke of california. ms. karen english of arizona. mr. mike barnes of maryland,ality -- alternate. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. please take your conversations off the floor. the house -- the chair will now entertain requests for one-minutes. please take your conversations off the floor. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania rise? mr. thompson: i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. thompson: madam speaker, the house is not in order. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania deserves to be heard. please take your convers
are the umbrella for so many other agencies in our government. if we were not there, many of those agencies representatives -- agencies' representatives would have a difficult time being there. we are the diplomatic presence that permits us to pursue law enforcement objectives, intelligence objectives, military objectives, and so much more. so it's not just about us sitting around and say, you know, do we really want our diplomats at risk? it's ok, what are the equities of the rest of the government that would be effective if we decided we had to close shop because the risk was too great? i want to stress that because i don't think you can understand, at least from my perspective, how difficult the calculation is without knowing that it's not just about the state department and usaid. secondly, i don't think we can retreat from these hard places. we have to harden our security presence but we can't retreat. we've got to be there. we've got to be picking up intelligence information, building relationships and if we had a whole table of some of our most experienced ambassadors sitting here to
was worn some as the 40th president of the united states ushering in an era of limited government and the rise of the modern conservative movement. yesterday barack obama, the 44th president of the united states, was sworn in for his second term. the moment that will define progressive politics m years to come and one that symbolizes a renewed faith and the power of the american government. needless to say, it was a day several decades in the making. >> for the first time in history government, the people said, was not our master. it is our servant. >> government is not the problem, and government is not the solution. we, the american people, we are the solution. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid and social security, these things do not sapp our nation. they strengthen us. they do not make us a taker of nags. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. >> as he made a forceful case for economic equality and the social safety net president obama championed the american belief in equality of race, gender, and sexual orientation,
strikes me even more than the lack of bipartisanship and the aggressionive support for big government was that there's just no sense of that... that these things are part of our reality. >> brown: rev. hamilton, what did you hear? you had an interesting look from the pulpit today >> sure. well, first of all i think when the president is giving an inaugural address like this,ese trying to cast a lofty vision for the future rather than trying to get into the details of policy. so for me i heard him speaking about equality. i heard him speaking about the vision of children being able to have a future with hope. and i wasn't expecting him to give a detailed analysis of the economy today and what needs to be changed. i'm not suggesting that's not important but i was hearing him speak about lofty ideas of equality and freedom >> brown: yet he did point to some specific things as we heard in gwen's set-up >> that is true when it came to global warming or addressing the global climate change, i think we have to be willing to address these things. >> brown: trey grayson, what did you hear? >>
of people up to that point. did you get an adequate explanation why help was not coming from our government and the president, and what's the rational decision, charlene lamb said they were watching it at the state department in real-time. >> i didn't get an adequate explanation and the question, if we have the battleships and air ships, if they're in germany. is that close enough to the middle east, should they be in italy, in north africa, should there be a military presence in libya if we have an embassy there? a lot of questions that were not fully answered a lot of questions that were incompletely answered and ultimately i think the biggest problem they tried to treat the embassy in libya like you would the embassy in paris and tried to say they're the same thing and they're not. one is in a war zone and should have been treated differently. i'm still fearful that in the future we could have another problem in libya or if syria gets a new government are we going to do the same thing and send an embassy to a new government in syria without adequate military protection, that's what i'm c
a border security would be beefed up and the government would improve its tracking of current visa holders. the senators also want to grant more green cards to highly educated immigrants and would allow more lower-skilled workers into the country especially for agricultural purposes. finally, the agreement calls for an effective verification system to crack down on employers who hire workers in the country illegally. in 2006 and 2007, similar efforts to fix the nation's patchwork of immigration laws failed under both republican and democratically controlled congresses but democratic senator chuck sheumer of new york said this time will be different. >> the politics on this issue have been turn upsidedown. for the first time ever there's more political risk in opposing immigration reform than in supporting it. >> ifill: indeed this new effort comes on the heels of last year's election in which president obama won seven of every ten hispanic votes in his victory over republican mitt romney. senator john mccain of arizona said that's the key reason his party must now get on board. >> election
and the government would improve its tracking of current visa holders. the senators also want to grant more green cards to highly educated immigrants and would allow more lower-skilled workers into the country especially for agricultural purposes. finally the agreement calls for an effective verification system to crack down on employers who hire workers in the country illegally. in 2006 and 2007 similar efforts to fix the nation's patchwork of immigration laws failed under both republican and democratically controlled congresses but democratic senator chuck sheumer of new york said this time will be different. >> the politics on this issue have been turn upsidedown. for the first time ever there's more political risk in opposing immigration reform than in supporting it. >> ifill: indeed this new effort comes on the heels of last year's election in which president obama won seven of every ten hispanic votes in his victory over republican mitt romney. senator john mccain of arizona said that's the key reason his party must now get on board. >> elections. elections. the republican party is losing t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 200 (some duplicates have been removed)